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Costly Living

tanya1Why do most people keep silent? What are they afraid of? Is the cost of their voice too great a price? What if Martin Luther kept silent? What if Harriet Tubman kept her own freedom to herself? What if Nelson Mandela decided not to join the ANC?

What did it cost Harriet to do what she did? In regards to Martin Luther King, one could say it cost him his life. I often wonder, did it?

Who is to say what the cost was for either of them personally? Was Martin’s life taken as great as the cost of him speaking out? The value of his life still remains. Many of us live like we are already dead.

We live in a world of comparisons, weighing the risks, the cost. Often choosing the easier route.

Nelson Mandela. Was the cost of his freedom greater than the cost of his speaking out? Do you think in the moment of decision that he stopped and weighed his options? His cost was great. Even in prison, Mandela remained free. Some of us are free but still imprisoned. Unlike Harriet Tubman, some of us are still enslaved.

Are we afraid of bondage, prison, or death? What’s the point of living if we find ourselves in our own cell or morgue of self-centeredness?

What if the cost is to lose our own self journey? And once the denying of self is conquered, to take the lessons of the journey and share its freedom with others. Think about Matthew 16:24: “Then Jesus said to His disciples, “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.”

Humanity is always ready for love. It was created by Love. It constantly groans for love in order for it to grow properly and healthy. When we don’t speak up about hatred, which is the opposite of love, we allow hatred to be the driving force of humanity instead of love.

Since we are eternal beings, is the cost of physical death really the greatest cost? I think dying a physical death having never experienced what it means to love and to be loved is the greatest tragedy.

quote-tanya

 

— edited by Felicia Murrell

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